NASA SLS Water Fountain

NASA recently tested their all-new Ignition Overpressure Protection and Sound Suppression Water Deluge System at the Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Pad 39B for its new Space Launch System (SLS). This test created a giant 2-million liter (450,000 gallon) water fountain in just over a minute. “When the mobile launcher is sitting on its pad surface mount mechanisms, the rest of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression System is connected to the pad supply headers and the water will flow through supply piping and exit through the nozzles…[as the water subsides], it flows into the flame trench and onto the east pad surface before finding its way to the east and west holding ponds through channels, called water flumes, or off the pad surface through the water drains and trenches,” said Nick Moss, NASA’s pad deputy project manager. Read more for another video on the SLS and additional information.



“The recent test was undertaken as part of preparations for the planned 2020 launch of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on the uncrewed Exploration Mission-1 test flight to the moon using the Orion spacecraft, and for subsequent manned missions deeper into space. SLS is almost equal in strength to SpaceX’s in-development BFR, with both of these rockets the only ones set to surpass the power of Saturn V, the rocket that thrust multiple moon missions into space in the late 1960s and early 1970s,” reports Digital Trends.