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3D-Printed Sushi

Open Meals has partnered with marketing firm Dentsu to open a restaurant in Tokyo next year that will offer 3D-printed sushi catered to individual dietary needs. How does it work? After making a reservation, the restaurant sends a “health test kit” where you send back a biological sample — saliva, urine, stool — and they analyze what kinds of nutrients best suits your body’s needs. “Then we add those specific nutrients to your food to 3D print out those sushi for you,” said a representative. Read more for more unusual 3d-printer creations.

Homemade Mecha Robot

Japanese engineer Masaaki Nagumo has always wanted a real-life Mobile Suit Gundam mecha. So, he built LW-Mononofu, a 28-foot-tall robot that weighs in at 7-tons as a project for his employer, industrial machinery maker Sakakibara Kikai. It took six years to complete, with movable arms / fingers, a flexible upper body, and the ability to walk forwards and backwards. Plus, what would a mecha be without a weapon, as it comes equipped with a metal gun that shoots sponge balls at a speeds of up to 87 mph. Read more for five more cool robots you won’t believe exist.

SEGA 32X

First unveiled at the 1994 Consumer Electronics Show, SEGA’s 32X was presented as a low-cost add-on for the Genesis video game console, and designed to expand its power, thus serving as a transitional console into the 32-bit era until the release of the Saturn. It was mainly developed in response to the Atari Jaguar and concerns that the Saturn would not make it to market by the end of 1994, making the accessory a transitional device of sorts. The production model boasts two 32-bit central processing units and a 3D graphics processor. Read more for five more cool facts about this accessory.

Sony Walkman

Does this device look familiar? If so, that’s because it was featured in the Guardians of the Galaxy movies. That’s right, Sony’s metal-cased blue-and-silver Walkman TPS-L2 is the world’s first low-cost portable stereo, and went on sale in Japan on July 1, 1979, priced at around ¥39,433.58 (or $150.00), or ¥57,109.02 (or $498.66) adjusted for inflation. The company predicted it would sell about 5,000 units a month, but actually sold more than 50,000 in the first two months. Read more for more cool facts.

Longest Hot Wheels Track

If you’ve never heard of Hot Wheels, it’s basically a brand of 1:64, 1:43, 1:18 and 1:50 scale die-cast toy cars introduced by toy maker Mattel in 1968. The original Hot Wheels were made by Elliot Handler, and conceived to be more like “hot rod” cars, as compared to Matchbox cars which were more like small-scale models of production cars. Mattel Inc. wanted to enter the record books, so they built the longest Hot Wheels track, measuring a massive 560.30 m (1,838 ft 3.05 in) in length – making it longer than the height of New York’s Empire State Building. Read more for various geeky Guinness World Records you probably never knew existed.

New Apple iPad 32GB Latest Model

The Apple iPad 32GB (Latest Model) is normally priced at $329, but can be picked up for just $249 shipped on Black Friday. Featuring a 9.7-inch Retina display, an A10 Fusion chip with 64-bit desktop-class architecture, a Touch ID fingerprint sensor, 8MP camera with 1080p video, a 1.2MP FaceTime HD camera, 802.11ac Wi-Fi with MIMO, and up to 10 hours of battery life. Read more for additional Black Friday tech deals.

Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone is the officially designated exclusion zone around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster. Its purpose is to restrict access to hazardous areas, reduce the spread of radiological contamination and conduct radiological and ecological monitoring activities. Today the Exclusion Zone is one of the most radioactively contaminated areas in the world and draws significant scientific interest for the high levels of radiation exposure in the environment, as well as increasing interest from tourists. Continue reading for more strange places that you may not have known about.

Dog CPR

Poncho the police dog of the Madrid Municipal Police recently became a social media star after a video began circulating of the pup demonstrating his life-saving skills. As you can see in the video above, as soon as his human partner collapses to the ground, Poncho springs into action, performing CPR, while also laying his head on the man’s mouth to check his breathing. Continue reading for more strange, yet true, stories from around the world to kick off your weekend.

Domus Aurea Octagonal Court

Photo credit: My Voucher Codes via Bored Panda

The Domus Aurea was basically a vast landscaped palace built by the Emperor Nero in the heart of ancient Rome after the great fire in 64 AD had destroyed a large part of the city and the aristocratic villas on the Palatine Hill. Architects designed two of the principal dining rooms to flank an octagonal court, surmounted by a dome with a giant central oculus to let in light. Only fragments have survived, but that technique was to be copied extensively, eventually ending up as a fundamental feature of Christian art: the apse mosaics that decorate so many churches in Rome, Ravenna, Sicily and Constantinople. Continue reading to see more historical ruins reconstructed back to their former glory.

Buried in BMW

Azubuike, a man from Nigeria, had recently lost his father to old age and decided to bury him in a luxury car rather than a casket. So, he spent approximately $90,000 USD on a new BMW X5, placed his father’s body inside, and then buried it in an extra-large, six-foot-deep grave near his village. Continue reading for five more strange, yet true, things, including a cryptocurrency scavenger hunt on Mount Everest.