Wireless Brain Computer Neural Interface
Photo credit: Future Timeline
Scientists at Brown University in Rhode Island have created the first wireless brain-computer interface capable of transmitting signals with ‘single-neuron resolution and in full broadband fidelity.’ The BrainGate technology consists of a small transmitter that connects to a person’s brain motor cortex. Participants with paralysis used the system to control a tablet computer and achieved similar typing speeds and point-and-click accuracy as they could with wired systems. Read more for videos on brain-computer interfaces and additional information.



The signals are recorded and transmitted with similar fidelity, which means they can use the same decoding algorithms as wired equipment. However, the main difference is that people no longer need to be physically tethered to equipment, which opens up new possibilities in terms of how the system can be used.

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We’ve demonstrated that this wireless system is functionally equivalent to the wired systems that have been the gold standard. The signals are recorded and transmitted with appropriately similar fidelity, which means we can use the same decoding algorithms we used with wired equipment. The only difference is that people no longer need to be physically tethered to our equipment, which opens up new possibilities in terms of how the system can be used,” said John Simeral, an assistant professor of engineering at Brown University.